Weight Management

Weight management is the phrase used to describe both the techniques and underlying physiological processes that contribute to a person's ability to attain and maintain a certain weight. Most weight management techniques encompass long-term lifestyle strategies that promote healthy eating and daily physical activity.

Obesity is a chronic condition that affects more than one in three adults and about 17 percent of children and adolescents in the United States. More than one in three adults is overweight. Being overweight or obese increases your risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, fatty liver disease, kidney disease, and other health issues.

If you are struggling with your weight, you may find that a healthy eating plan and regular physical activity help you lose weight and keep it off over the long term.

Keeping a healthy weight is crucial. If you are underweight or overweight, or have obesity, you may have a higher risk of certain health problems.

About two thirds of adults in the U.S. are overweight or have obesity. Achieving a healthy weight can help you control your cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. It might also help you prevent weight-related diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, arthritis and some cancers.

Eating too much or not being physically active enough will make you overweight. To maintain your weight, the calories you eat must equal the energy you burn. To lose weight, you must use more calories than you eat. A weight-control strategy might include

  • Choosing low-fat, low-calorie foods

  • Eating smaller portions

  • Drinking water instead of sugary drinks

  • Being physically active

Eating extra calories within a well-balanced diet can help to add weight.